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Story:
In Usulutan, on top of the Tepaca volcano, you can find Los Pirineos owned by the producer Gilberto Baraona. It’s located on a volcanic mountain range surrounded by the cities of Berlin, Santiago de Maria and Joy. The farm is in an area with a great cool climate for slow maturation, good rainfall and fertile volcanic soils. The cultivation of coffee at the farm was started in 1890 and according to family accounts, the original seeds of the property, and the mother plants were imported from Antigua Guatemala. The coffee is separated into small to medium sized batches based up on different parts of the farm and coffee varietals. Currently the farm cultivates the varietals Bourbon Elite, Pacas and Pacamara, but the farm has also taken part in a Procafe project growing different varietals. As a result they have plots of of native coffee trees, natural mutants and hybrids originated from all over the world. Los Pirineos farm was one of the pioneers in El Salvador to build its own Micro Coffee Mill. The producer still experiments with processing and drying methods.
Production process: Well-trained pickers are given good incentives to select ripe cherries only. The coffee is brought to the Los Pirineos micro mill in the afternoon to be hand sorted of unripes and over ripes.

Honey process: They use new Jotagallo eco pulpers with mechanical demucilager to remove the skin, pulp and about 70% of the mucilage. The parchment is soaked over night in clean water before it’s washed.

Drying: Sun dried under shade on raised beds for 3-4 weeks..
Soil: Sandy loam, Volcanic soils
Grade: Screen 15 up, zero defects.

Story:
Kagwanja is one of the 13 factories within the Komothai FCS. Some of the factories are very far away from each other within the Kiambu county. Kiambu lies just on the slopes of the Aberdare mountains. The factory manager is Gatu Kiigi.

Processing:
The cherries are sorted before being pulped. The parchment is then fermented overnight, before being washed and graded into P1, P2, P3, P lights and pods. After that, it is dried on the drying tables for 8-14 days. Within the Komothai FCS, all the factories are processing the coffee the same way.

Story:
This coffee is created through a joint effort from the Garcia family. Antonio Wander and Andre Luiz Garcia are father and son. Agriculture is part of the family history, Antonio’s grandfather, Alexander Capelo Garcia was small a coffee producer, and Antonio became an IBC research Agronomist specializing in the area of fertility and nutrition. He has dedicated his whole life to knowing and producing coffee. Now, he has the support from his son André who is also an agronomist, researcher at Procafé Foundation specializing in pruning and producing coffees. The farm is situated next to Sao Joao del Rei, a very important historic town in the colonization of Brazil and famous due to the gold mining and have historically not had the tradition of coffee production. With a predominance of mountains at high altitudes (for being Brazil) the coffee trees have adapted very well. The soil type on the farm is red/yellow, volcanic with medium texture typical of the savanna region. They are growing Acaia, Yellow Catuai, Yellow Catucai and Mundo Novo. Andre’s work with Procafe gives him good insight into varieties and how they can be grown on his own farm. They are only processing coffee as Naturals, but are young and adventurous with experimenting within this realm of processing.

Story:

Among coffee-producing countries, Ethiopia holds near-legendary status not only because it’s the “birthplace” of Arabica coffee, but also because it is simply unlike every other place in the coffee world. Unlike the vast majority of coffee-growing countries, the plant was not introduced as a cash crop through colonization. Instead, growing, processing, and drinking coffee is part of the everyday way of life, and has been for centuries, since the trees were discovered growing wild in forests and eventually cultivated for household use and commercial sale. Ambela Washing Station serves about 680 smallholder producers in the area around Dintu, in the Ambela district of Guji. Most of the producers own about 1.5 hectares of land, on which they grow not only coffee but also other crops. The coffee is delivered to the washing station in cherry form and depulped the same day, then fermented underwater for 48–72 hours before being washed. Then it's soaked for 8–16 additional hours and washed again. The coffee is then spread on raised beds and dried for about 9 – 12 days. According to the washing station manager, most of the coffee delivered to the factory is Bourbon, and some is Typica: While these are two varieties better-known in Central and South America, the same terms are used colloquially in Ethiopia to describe certain coffee- berry-disease-resistant cultivars. The Ethiopian "Bourbon" and "Typica" varieties are typically genetically removed from the ones found elsewhere around the world.

Story:
The Regional Select program was created to highlight the unique profiles we can found that are inherent to various microclimates in the country. Local variables like wind patterns, soil quality, sunlight, elevation, and other environmental influencers have much to do with the common characteristics that separate, say, a Northern Colombian from a Southern Colombian coffee, just as they inform the differences between a Colombian and a Kenyan. Regional Select is sourced based on cup quality and character, seeking a balance of “taste of place” with availability and price. These lots are built as blends from coffees that cup out between 84–87 from 100-point cupping scale, and come with regional and often microregional traceability, but are not farm- or producer-specific. Coffees from Cauca benefit from high elevation, cool nights, good varieties, and intentional husbandry.

Story:

Esteven Vargas and his father, Hiver Vargas, started the Don Sabino micromill in around 2011, though both men have been in coffee their whole lives. Starting in 2014, the father-son partners decided to switch all of their production over to naturals, because they like the profile, and  their green-coffee buyer Luis Arocha says, “I keep asking them their secret, because their coffee is very good!” The cups have a very delicate acidity for being full naturals, and articulate sweetness and complex flavor.

Perhaps one of the secrets of their production is that they keep things close to home—literally— which helps them control quality

 

Process:

After the coffee is harvested, dried, and milled, it is stored at the family house: “If you’re in the living room and you walk through the rooms, you will see coffee bags stored all over the house.” Luis says. “When you’re in the house, there is the intense aroma of raisin because the coffee is so intense.”

 

 

Story:

Sehe Washing Station is one of the newly built washing stations by a Burundian Salum Ramadhan. Its located in the province of Shibitoke in the hills of Bukinyanana commune. The site manager is a young guy called Christopher. Its a medium sized washing station and they receive about 400 tons of cherry pr season. That adds up to about 3 containers of specialty. They have a great clean natural water source. There is about 160 drying tables and 37 of them have a 2 stories, meaning the coffees will partially be dried in shade. Salum is now also specialized in producing naturals and honeys as well as regular washed and all he’s 4 washing stations. Salum has owned the land in Sehe for some time. He’s extremely detail oriented, spends a lot of time to train local staff and have a great loyal work force. The coffees are basically all selected daily lots, named by the local area or Collin (hill) where the cherries are purchased. Farms in Burundi is small, often below one hectar each with some hundred trees. This means that a daily lot of e.g. 25 bags of greens can consist of coffee from some hundred growers. He is systematically separating the coffees based on where they are grown, and by the date of processing. They generally collect cherries from a range of areas with different altitudes, growing conditions etc, and the flavor range is pretty wide spread according to that. He’s also investing in social and environmental projects such as education in the local areas, ponds for waste water etc.

Picking and selection

The main harvest will normally start very slowly in March, peak around May (depending on altitude and weather) and end in July. The family members on the small farms are working the land, picking the coffee cherries themselves in the afternoon or on Saturdays. They will then either deliver the cherries to Mbirizi washing station by foot or bicycle, or to the closest collection points where Salum will have he’s site collector, meaning a representative from Mbirizi washing station. They are strategically placed in remote areas to buy cherries. The farmers are free to deliver their cherries to anyone offering the highest price. And the competition in this area can be hard. Salum and he’s collectors will communicate with the local farmers on selective picking and sorting. To attract farmers with the best qualities they are constantly paying premiums above the market prices to improve the product.

Cherry reception

Bringing in cherries from the different collection points is expensive as the cost of transport in Burundi is high. Still, it has been good for quality as he have well trained staff, good capacity and infra structure to produce micro lots.

Process:

They have gotten really good experience with their naturals the past few years. And its been improved a lot. They are generally making naturals when they have great cherry quality coming in and when they have enough capacity on the tables to do it properly. The cherries are soaked in water to remove all floaters. They spread it out in a single layer about the first 2 days while they are sorting out immature, deceased and overripe cherries. Its also to get it dried faster in the beginning of the drying cycle as that seems to create a cleaner and brighter profile in their environment. After the 2 – 3 first days they slowly build up the layers, and are moving and turning the cherries on the table multiple times pr day.

 

 

Story:

While coffee came to Guatemala in the late 18th century, as with much of the Central and South American colonies, cultivation of the crop began to gain steam in the 1860s, with the arrival of European immigrants who were encouraged by the Guatemalan government to establish plantations. Seeds and young coffee plants were distributed as encouragement, as the country’s main export crop (indigo) had recently failed, leaving the population somewhat desperate to find an agricultural replacement. By the late 1800s, Guatemala was exporting more nearly 300 million pounds of coffee annually. Until 2011, it was among the five largest coffee-producing countries in the world, though in recent years it has been outperformed by Honduras.

HUEHUETENANGO is probably the most famous (and difficult to pronounce—it is generally said “way-way-ten-AN-go”) region, and has the highest altitudes in the country, as high as 2,000 meters. Crisp malic and citrus acidity, full body, and toffee sweetness mark these coffees, which tend to be the most fruit-forward and can be the most complex of what Guatemala has to offer.

Process:

Otilio López Jiménez farms coffee on just 1 manzana in San Pedro Necta, a community whose main source of income is derived almost entirely from coffee. After picking the cherries, he depulps the same day, then ferments them dry for 18–24 hours before washing them three times. He dries his coffee on patios and on nylon tarps for about 3.5–6 days, weather dependent.

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Contact

Contact


Phone: +36 1 237 0074
Fax: +36 1 237 0075
Email: info@ecorange.hu

Ecorange Kft.
1033. Budapest,
Szentendrei út 95.

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